Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from asylums-  188 notes

Photographer David Maisel’s Library of Dust depicts individual copper canisters, each containing the cremated remains of patient from a state-run psychiatric hospital. The patients died at the hospital between 1883 (the year the facility opened, when it was called the Oregon State Insane Asylum) and the 1970’s; their bodies have remained unclaimed by their families.

"The approximately 3,500 copper canisters have a handmade quality; they are at turns burnished or dull; corrosion blooms wildly from the leaden seams and across the surfaces of many of the cans. Numbers are stamped into each lid; the lowest number is 01, and the highest is 5,118. The vestiges of paper labels with the names of the dead, the etching of the copper, and the intensely hued colors of the blooming minerals combine to individuate the canisters. These deformations sometimes evoke the celestial - the northern lights, the moons of some alien planet, or constellations in the night sky. Sublimely beautiful, yet disquieting, the enigmatic photographs in Library of Dust are meditations on issues of matter and spirit.

On my first visit to the hospital, I am escorted to a decaying outbuilding, where a dusty room lined with simple pine shelves is lined three-deep with thousands of copper canisters. Prisoners from the local penitentiary are brought in to clean the adjacent hallway, crematorium, and autopsy room. A young male prisoner in a blue uniform, with his feet planted firmly outside the doorway, leans his upper body into the room, scans the cremated remains, and whispers in a low tone, ‘The library of dust.’ The title and thematic structure of the project result from this encounter.”

-David Maisel, Photographer. See full project here.

Reblogged from travelry  41,033 notes

travelry:

The most beautiful cat cafe I have been to. It’s called Temari no Ouchi (Temari’s house) in Tokyo, Japan. The soft music and ambience feels like you are in a Studio Ghibli film. Had to take the Japan Railway there, but was totally worth the extra trip, & unlike the central Tokyo cat cafes, this one has no time limit, so feels totally relaxed. Several girls were even sleeping there amongst the cats.